What are Dental Implants??

Dental implants are the new standard of care for tooth replacement. They are secured into the bone to provide long term support for crowns and dentures. Dental implants are placed into the bone in a relatively pain-free procedure. The bone and gums will be given time to heal before an abutment and crown are attached. In most cases, you can receive a temporary crown the same day the implant is placed

ARE DENTAL IMPLANTS FOR ME?

  • Are you missing all natural teeth in one or both jaws?
  • Are you missing one or more teeth in a jaw?
  • Are you having difficulty wearing a regular removable denture because you gag , find the denture too bulky , feel pain , or generally dislike something movable in the mouth?
  • Do you have an oral defect or missing mouth part because of an injury , surgery to treat disease , or birth defect ?

If you answered yes to any of the above conditions or preferences you may be a candidate for dental implants .

ADVANTAGES:

As implants fuse to your jawbone, they provide stable support for artificial teeth. Dentures and bridges mounted to implants won’t slip or shift in your mouth — an especially important benefit when eating and speaking. This secure fit helps the dentures and bridges — as well as individual crowns placed over implants — feel more natural than conventional bridges or dentures.

For some people, ordinary bridges and dentures are simply not comfortable or even possible, due to sore spots, poor ridges or gagging. In addition, ordinary bridges must be attached to teeth on either side of the space left by the missing tooth. An advantage of implants is that no adjacent teeth need to be prepared or ground down to hold your new replacement tooth/teeth in place.

To receive implants, you need to have healthy gums and adequate bone to support the implant. You must also commit to keeping these structures healthy. Meticulous oral hygiene and regular dental visits are critical to the long-term success of dental implants.

 

 

What will my dentist do?

Your dentist should tell you about the stages of treatment, who would be carrying out each stage and the timetable for completing treatment. You might be referred to a specialist.

  • Bone is exposed in the jaw where the tooth is missing. Then a hole is drilled and a metal post is inserted into the bone. This is usually done under local anaesthetic, but sometimes sedation or general anaesthetic is used. The gum is then stitched over the post and it’s left to heal for several months, until the bone has grown around the post, making it secure.
  • A second operation then happens, in which replacement teeth are mounted onto the implants. This requires a small cut in the gum above the implant. The replacement teeth might be single or in a group, and possibly as a ‘bridge’, attached to neighbouring natural teeth. They may be fixed permanently or attached in a way that lets you remove them for cleaning.
  • Bone is exposed in the jaw where the tooth is missing. Then a hole is drilled and a metal post is inserted into the bone. This is usually done under local anaesthetic, but sometimes sedation or general anaesthetic is used. The gum is then stitched over the post and it’s left to heal for several months, until the bone has grown around the post, making it secure.
  • A second operation then happens, in which replacement teeth are mounted onto the implants. This requires a small cut in the gum above the implant. The replacement teeth might be single or in a group, and possibly as a ‘bridge’, attached to neighbouring natural teeth. They may be fixed permanently or attached in a way that lets you remove them for cleaning.